About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
MSNBCW 28
CSPAN 24
CNNW 23
MSNBC 18
CNN 14
CSPAN2 13
CURRENT 11
KQED (PBS) 9
KRCB (PBS) 5
WETA 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
WRC (NBC) 5
KPIX (CBS) 4
WUSA (CBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 215
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 215 (some duplicates have been removed)
against the prime minister's government. they say the government promotes sectarian policies that discriminate against them. the latest violence began after the police. -- block protesters from entering the city. >> which call upon the army -- we call upon the army affiliated with iraq. if it is only loyal to the muslim nation and only belongs to the good land of iraq, to open the way for the scholars and people to give in to the city. they are not allowed to get in right now. the army has to be loyal to iraq. >> let's take some live pictures coming in from fallujah. the crowds are still swelling. a lot of sunnis and happy and calling for the government to be dissolved and one more representative of the people to be formed. we will bring you the story as we get the details. let's continue with live pictures. this is coming from egypt. people are beginning to gather in tahrir square. a large turnout is expected in the next few hours. opposition groups are marking the second anniversary of the revolution. overnight, protesters fought with police in and around tahrir square. doz
concept i want to talk to is there. america is not the federal government. >> let that sink n. america is not the federal government. in america government is one of those things you have to have but you sure don't want too much of it. it's kind of like your family visiting over the holidays. i have to be careful about what i say about family. this is of course the opposite of the political debate in your country today. we have one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can expand it. we've got one that wants to be in charge so they can get it under control. that's a terrible debate. it's a debate fought on our opponents terms. a debate about who can better manage the government is a small debate. if our vision isn't bigger than that we don't deserve to win. >> america is defined by government. if you were to land here from outer space or watch tv for a week or watch the news, you would co-come to the conclusion that washington is the hub of america which and what happens in washington is what drives and dick tates the success or failure of america. in addit
of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could somehow have shut the flood gates and prevented the revolution in egypt. backing mubarak wasn't an option. and i think the president did the right thing by trying to get on the right side of history there. but now the challenge of the post revolutionary phase in egypt is to try to work with a government there tha
she served as national security and state department, negotiated the u.s. government -- with u.s. government with iranian officials here she's nice to hear professor lecture at american university in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing dec
that the u.s. needs to change its policy towards the government of iran which they say is a rational actor and will play a leading role in the middle east for years to come. this is about an hour. >> it is an honor this morning to introduce flynt leverett who served at the state department and cia, but he's currently a professor at penn state out of carlyle. also with him is hillary mann leverett, and she served at the national security council and the state department. she negotiated the u.s. government, with the u.s. government with the iranian officials. she's now a senior professor, lecturer at american university in washington. their writing has appeared in "the new york times," politico, foreign policy and washington monthly, among others. they came to us last night from virginia. they took the late night train and stayed here. and what i'd like to do is just turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> well, thank you very much. i'm going to start off for us today. let me start by thanking you for hosting us. it's a real honor and pleasure, and we look forward
it poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability. and peaceful transition of governments. we're reminded of that almost every day. and -- sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming across northern africa and moving down to the sub sahara part of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we have seen that ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre 9/11. t true that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i want to get that mentioned in there. we're living in different kind of world. it's hard to define where the threat is because it popping up everywhere. it's like wack a mole. you wack one iraq and you think it get it settles and you're back in afghanistan. and we are in the arab spring and libya and algeria and things are happening that pose real threats particularly at the time when the possibility of the combination of weapons of mass destruction and terrorists can result in attack on american presence
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
politics. many are still traumatized. al jazeera, malian border. >> in syria, activists say government forces are shelling more on the capital damascus. activists also posted this video online of rebels of having regime troops in a prison. rebels have read more than 80 inmates. an iranian official said an attack on syria is considered an attack on iran. patriot missile battles could spark a broader conflict. turkey and nato stressed the system is particularly defensive. >> these batteries are designed to intercept missiles and the threats comes from syria. this is one of three areas. turkey and nato officials have repeatedly said the missiles will in no way be used for an offensive operation or to support a no-fly zone. >> it is pretty obvious that the defensive systems are only for defensive purposes want you look -- want to look at their location. >> and it just as the deployment will contribute to the deal escalation of the prices along the border. russia and iran have said the deployment could spark a broader conflict. >> turkey requested the misfiles after several incidences. thos
again. i realize that would be gratis, you would not be on the government payroll and do the hearing i would like to have which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the host country. this all a discussion about well, there might have been five security people on the ground, if only there was more funding or deployment, or this cable or that cable maybe there would be eight or nine security people on the ground which might have led to more protection or might have led to more casualties. in washington, the decision was made to provide well more than 16 security people to libya and nobody that i know in washington, dc, was involved in the issue of how many of those were in benghazi going with the ambassador or there in advance. the decision that all 16 weren't with him was a decision you cannot blame either political party or anyone in washington. ultimately, all we can have in our embassies is enough to keep off a militant attack for a few hours and after that if the host country doesn't come to a rescue it doe
continuing resolutions to fund the government forever is unsustainable. you need to pass a budget to begin with a foundation. >> mr. cole, i also talked to attorneys, our attorneys, some other attorneys, not just on our staff and i tell them, talk to me like i can understand you. because they talk too much legal lease. i ask them, if i get a paycheck in my account every month and i don't get that paycheck in my account, so whenever it may come, at the end of the year, that's varying. their opinion, that could be. they didn't say it was. they said it could be that could violate the 27th amendment because they're varyingnot coming this month. coming at the end of the year. the other thing i would like to -- don't understand -- and i want to tell you like i think and how it is. we are kind of like trying to not punish but penalize the other side. the senate. because they haven't acted. so what we're doing is drafting legislation that's going to make our side, whether we pass or maybe sometimes not pass a budget, and we're going to punish, not punish. maybe penalize our side by not getting a p
this libyan government have the will and capacity to have the suspects involved and i think they have to strain the capacity to try to arrest powerful armed elements in the eastern part of the country and i don't know if they have it even if they have the will to use that capacity. can you tell us after the attack that they are trying to bring the culprits to justice, what do you think of the libyan government. >> you drew exactly the right description. is it well or capacity? what you need is both. i found the libyan officials to be willing, but without capacity. part of our challenge is to help them build greater capacity because it's about them. it's not only about what happened to us in benghazi which every official in the libyan government was deeply upset about, but they have their own problems now. they are having leaders attack and assassinated on a regular basis. we have to do more to build up the security capacity and i would ask this committee to work with us. there holds on a lot of the security funding that go to kwlab to assist them in building capacity. there those i kn
are the umbrella for so many other agencies in our government. if we were not there, many of those agencies representatives -- agencies' representatives would have a difficult time being there. we are the diplomatic presence that permits us to pursue law enforcement objectives, intelligence objectives, military objectives, and so much more. so it's not just about us sitting around and say, you know, do we really want our diplomats at risk? it's ok, what are the equities of the rest of the government that would be effective if we decided we had to close shop because the risk was too great? i want to stress that because i don't think you can understand, at least from my perspective, how difficult the calculation is without knowing that it's not just about the state department and usaid. secondly, i don't think we can retreat from these hard places. we have to harden our security presence but we can't retreat. we've got to be there. we've got to be picking up intelligence information, building relationships and if we had a whole table of some of our most experienced ambassadors sitting here to
of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following individuals to serve as the governing board of the office of congressional ethics. the clerk: nominated by the speaker with the concurrence of the minority leader -- mr. porter j. goss, mr. egan, ms. hayward, mr. friendswood. nominated by the minority leader with the concurrence of the speaker -- mr. david scaggs of colorado, co-chairman. mrs. yvonne burke of california. ms. karen english of arizona. mr. mike barnes of maryland,ality -- alternate. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house -- the chair will now entertain requests for one-minutes. please take your conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania deserves to be heard. please take your convers
said it's an ode to big government and you pointed out in the list, gun control, gay marriage, global warming, he not only wants to lock in every liberal agenda item, but advance it further. will he be successful? second term are notoriously not successful. >> let's add global climate warming on her, climate change. we've already passed this through the congress. it's done. is congress going to pass it? is congress going to tell the states, no, you can't put that past voter i.d. laws? only in it's bipartisan doesn't require amnesty and citizenship. gun control passed, no. i think the president was basically declaring his administration is no longer substantive achievement. it's make the democratic party and making the republicans look more extreme. taking their strength to pass positive items that pile up over in the senate never to be really considered, but give them an agenda, a view that says to the american people he's over there worried about gun control. we're worried about getting jobs. he's over there worried about trying to get gay marriage. we want prosperity for your family
to the government can become prohibitive at times. so at life technologies what we've done is we try to focus our investments on technology that while the technology itself may be expensive, if you look holistically at the total cost of that patient event, it's significantly reducing the overall cost. let me tell you what i mean by that. if you have an $80,000 cancer drug regiment that only works in 25 percent of the patients, if we run a thousand dollar test and pick the 80% that don't receive benefit from that drug, not only do we spare the patient the side effects, we save health care a tremendous amount of cost. the administration, the obama administration a few years ago when we were in the throes of trying to figure out what we were going to do about health care, they used to quote some data, that $70 billion in 2008 was spent on oncology drugs and somewhere between 20 and 25 billion had no impact on the patient. so if we were to spend three billion in these amazing test capabilities to pick the 25 billion that wasn't going to respond, you save the overall health care costs. so we really ar
it together as a government, a community, as a state. in 2013, let us honor one another. our renewed community. let us honor those we have lost. we have a great deal of work to do. but if history is any judge, we will rise to the occasion. when called upon, we will answer as we have done time and time again. as one people, one community, and one connecticut. [applause] as we begin our work which will take many months, may god bless each and every one of you. madoff last the great state of connecticut and the united states of america. -- may god bless the creek state of connecticut, and the united states of america. [applause] >> on c-span2 night, house speaker john boehner and house republicans discussed federal spending in the national debt. then the house rules committee. a house ways and means committee and why he thinks the debate should be different -- separate from the talks. house speaker john boehner and other house republicans briefed reporters on a vote on the debt ceiling. the house will vote wednesday on a measure that will occur -- extend the debt limit until may 19. included is a
of mass destruction. we were told by every level of government here there were iraqi weapons of mass destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >
. whether the taliban will be resurgent, whether the government in afghanistan that will succeed president karzai's will be able to stand. those issues when you push the white house on them i tend to get people saying, look, we're ending these wars. we'll dole with what comes down the road. but we're not going to be deterred from our course. they think thos crucial strategically. they think they're in the business of reestablishing america's image abroad pre-9/11. reestablishing america's alliances and they think they've done that in the first four years and they want to continue it. and finally, the thing that is at the center of the white house's strategic thinking is this idea of rebalancing american power toward asia to dole with the rising china. they don't want anything to get in the way of that, even to the point of leaving what a lot of people fear is a vacuum of american power in areas that traditionally have been crucial to have american power, like the middle east. >> rose: but there's also, when you lock at who is happening in mali and you lock at sort of things that are happen
military. >> thank you so much for having me. >> change has already come. european governments are worried about the threat of terrorism in benghazi, libya, they are urging their citizens to leave immediately. britain, germany, and the netherlands have intelligence of a specific and imminent threat against westerners in the city a week after foreign hostages were seized and killed in algeria and four months after the u.s. ambassador was killed in benghazi. no one is taking any chances. our security correspondent reports. >> and other terrorist threat in north africa. the foreign office told all britons in benghazi to leave immediately because of a specific and imminent danger. >> this is a turbulent part of north africa and the whole of the region, north africa is an area where various militant groups organize. want to prevent that threat but we have got to put the safety of british citizens first. >> libyan officials say the warning to them by surprise. >> this announcement hints at something that is not exist on the ground. this is not justified enough in our opinion. >> only a few month
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
engagement and parts of the world but are struggling to build new governments. it underscores the real courage of the unsung women who put their lives at risk. i respect what you have done. this is a reflection of your leadership as well as your patriotism. your candor has been a trademark of your service as secretary of state. i believe every member has welcomed your openness and cooperation. your letter of december 18 was appreciated by members of both sides as another example of the openness. we share your mission here today. we look forward to a constructive dialogue to learn from the events that occurred in benghazi and to design policies that better protect the women serving in d.c. they lost their lives on september 11, 2012 during terrorist attacks on a special mission. we honor their service to our nation. we grieve with their families. the result to take specific actions to prevent future incidents as. we not be able to prevent every single attack in the future. we must make sure our employees are capable of standing up such an attack. they have embraced this. we will hear mo
. they are extremists and they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even those new islamists governments of controlling territory. although there has been the decimation of al qaeda, we do have could contend with the want to bes and affiliated going forward. >> thank you. >> thank you mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary, for being here. and it's great to see you today. you have been i think a real dedicated public serve ant for your country and your travels around the world, the million miles that you've put on and all of the countries you visited. and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state. and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these countries, the difference it makes to have you there on the ground. so i first of all just want to thank you for that and i know it does take a toll but you are incredibly dedicated to that. secondly, it's great to see you here in good health. >> thank you. >> smiling and engaging with all of us. and i want to add to the list people -- senators going down the line talked about some of your acco
government and the libyan government. i saw firsthand what is called, timely and exceptional coordination. no delays in decision making. no denials of support from washington or our military. i want to echo the review board praise for the valor and courage of the people on the ground, especially the security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. american lives were saved in real time. the next morning, i told the american people that heavily armed militants -- i stood with president obama as he spoke about an act of terror. it is important to recall in that same time period, we were seeing violent attacks in cairo, as well as large protests outside many other posts, where thousands of our diplomats served. so i immediately ordered a review of our security posture around the world, with particular scrutiny for high- threat posts. and i asked the department of defense to join interagency security assessment teams and to dispatch hundreds of additional marine security guards. i named the first deputy assistant secretary of state for high threat posts so that missions in dangerous places get
to be the nation states where we already are seeing cyber intrusions' both against our government and against private sector, but increasingly common on state actors will have more capacity to disrupt and to hack into put out false information to accuse the united states of things that can light five years before we can put them out. so, you know, i think it's important we have a really thoughtful comprehensive review about the threats of today and tomorrow and that will help guide the committee and the senate and the administration working together to answer them. >> thank you madam chair and onto something that hasn't been done. i'm going to yield back the rest of my time. >> we will not go to mr. perot of texas pittard >> thank you mr. chairman and madame secretary for your service to the country. gordon roland from oregon, frederick from texas and victor am i district of texas, three americans overseas killed not in benghazi, that killed at a remote gas facility in algeria. killed in my opinion because they were americans. over the last weekend, myself and others have tried to get informa
, we experienced the majesty of our democracy, a ritual only possible in a form of government that is of and by and for the people, a day made possible because there are patriots like each and every one of you who defend our freedom every single day. [cheers and applause] so this whole party is just another way to say something we can never say enough. thank you, thank you for volunteering, thank you for stepping up, and thank you for keeping us strong, for always making us proud. i have no greater honoring that been your commander in chief [cheers and applause] it's because of you that with hon your we're able to end the war in iraq, because of you that we delivered justice to bin laden. [cheers and applause] because of you that it's even possible to give afghans a chance to determine their own destiny. we are going forward and will keep our military the findest fighting force that the world's ever known. now, tonight, we're also joined by some of our service members in afghanistan. they can't see us, but we can see them on this monitor. who we got there? general, are you the
of the individuals and from the strength of civil society and not the government, which is what obama leaves -- believes is the objection of connectivity. if all of that is true, which i think it is, then i think four more years on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private sector will have results that will be unmistakable and there will be a shift away from it which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term though i'm not that optimistic about the short term. >> let's delve into more of the causes of it, the election result, and this may be a false choice, but to what extent do you think the outcome had to do with romney's weaknesses as an anecdote and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and perhaps the staleness of it, how much was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look a
to that u.s. for training. there were some who led the military coup, which overthrew the elected government. that is worrisome for us. we asked ourselves questions. did we miss the signs that this was happening? was there anything that we did in our training that was -- that could have been done differently and caused a different outcome? i think that the answer is a little bit of both. as we look at this from a purely military standpoint, we were focusing our training almost exclusively on tactical or technical matters. how to operate various pieces of equipment and how to improve effectiveness or tactical operations and the like. i see that there kernel is a paratrooper. -- colonel is a paratrooper. all of those things are very good. we did spend the requisite time focusing on values, ethics, and a military egos that says -- e cos that says when you put on aim u of the nation, you accept responsibility to defend and th protect that nation and abide by the legitimate authority that has been established duri an conductor sells to the rule of law and to see yourself as servants of people of
that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government bookkeeping. this is a rigged game, and it is the wrong game for us to play. >> and in a barely veiled reference to mitt romney and other republicans, jindal said republicans need to make it clear that they are a, quote, populous party. >> we must quit being -- we are not the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate looph e loopholes, or big anything. we must not be the party that simply protects the welloff, so they can keep their toys. >> nbc's senior political editor, mark murray is here, and he joins me now. and mark, it seems is if at any time a party gets thumped, they always have this come to jesus moment. we need to change what we've been doing before, we need to radically alter our strategy. reince priebus is going to say this to the rnc. "it's time to stop lacking at elections through the lens of battleground states. we have four years until the next presidential election, and being a blue state is not a permanent diagnosis. simple outreach a few months before an election wil
with the libyan government. they had a willingness to protect our people but not a capacity. if you knew there was no capacity, i saw that video from that night. i have to tell you, the libyans that we had charged, we outsourced our security to, they ran as soon as they saw those attackers come to the consulate gate. and so we knew they didn't have that capacity. i think as the person who is in charge, the accountability review board found that there were systemic failures of leadership, that this is a very important issue. >> i've been listening to the republicans getting on their high horse about this for a long time. i thought a lot of today's criticism was political grandstanding in many ways. if you go back to catastrophic intelligence failures before 9/11 or in the build to the iraq war more serious than this. that's not to diminish the deaths of four americans but those led to the deaths of many, many, many more americans. you got to say get this in perspective. hillary clinton to me seemed to me today to be sincere. i don't think anyone can expect the secretary of state to read e
government does not recognize your marriage and your partner cannot get social security benefits. if you are a federal employee, your spouse will not get your pension benefits, date and will not get health insurance, your children may not get health insurance. there are real life harm's every day from the defense of marriage act. we maintain that the defense of marriage act is unconstitutional. i certainly hope that the supreme court will find it so. line.miami, democrats' caller: good morning. my question to you is had you seen a lot of transgendered married with heterosexuals? what is the point of it, then? guest: well, i think transgendered people have always gotten married. some transgendered people are straight, some transgendered people are gay. the ones who are straight are allowed to marry in some places, the ones who are gay are only allowed to marry in states i mentioned already. again, i am not sure by how anyone else's marriage or life is impacted in any bad way if people are allowed to make commitments to the person they glove and strengthen their family -- they love and str
, but they have been working off a continuing resolution which funds the government for certain amount of time. it will end on march 27. house leaders tried to put forward or sketched out a game plan for how they would handle things going forward. the first step in all this is the vote today on a short-term debt limit extension. host: seth, you mentioned the republican retreat last week and on conversations with conservatives, an event on capitol hill yesterday. what kind of dissent did you hear from conservative republicans on the debt ceiling vote? guest: they want to make sure that they get some sort of deficit reduction out of this. i think it makes them a little nervous. this is what many will referred to as a clean vote on the debt ceiling, if they're not a lot of strings attached. they would like to see more deficit reduction. i think they are a little weary that leadership will follow through on their promises. so it is within that vein. i guess i would say that conservative lawmakers, at least the most conservative, wants to be cautiously optimistic that house leaders might follow thr
earlier today that a short-term extension of the debt limit may raise the u.s. government debt service costs. that is highly speculative. but rooney 11 gao study showed significant results. three out of every five had no impact. the 2012 report was based on only one event. statistically inconclusive. the bipartisan estimate are based upon both of these gao studies, and they missed the point. the fact of the matter is unsustainable spending over time without doubt will raise cost of our borrowing in america. that's why we are all here today to deal with this issue, or attempt to give our best insight. i'd like to ask dr. foster a question with related to the debt ceiling. many of us see the other side of that coin as a credit downgrade, the second one, which has serious consequences, not just for our borrowing but for borrowing of small businesses and consumers at home. my question to you, and i know there's different opinions, but what do you think congress has to do? what steps should we take to create not just medium term fiscal consolidation addressing that issue but long-term deali
's gun-control proposals. while the government has come out against the plan, the numbers are pretty stark. 53% are favorable. 41%, unfavorable. more interesting as you go into the poll, the favorables are much more intense than the unfavorables. which means that we've heard for some time, richard wolffe, you know, the gun owners are so intense, and they're the ones that are going to always make phone calls and they're the ones that are always going to be engaged. in this poll and i'm sure we'll see it in other polls, a majority of americans are more intense about passing some sane gun regulation than are those small groups of people that are going to fight the political death over assault weapons and being able to have high-capacity magazines. >> a couple of things. first of all, if you break down the individual proposals, the support is even higher, right? universal background checks, you get way higher than 50%. and those numbers reflect the president's own favorability right now which says this is the moment when he can actually push this through because his own numbers are so hi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 215 (some duplicates have been removed)